Welcome to ChargerPro.com!

 


Coming soon... I will also be selling and repairing power
adapters with either AC or DC outputs, with currents up
to 5.0 Amps (5000ma).  I currently have a large variety in stock
now, but will have better offerings in the winter of 2009.

Instructions:

Battery Tests Extended Life Tips

Pardon my dust, while this site is under construction!

 

My two beagles and I specialize in the sales and repair of all makes of SLOW chargers, which are generally called 3- to 18-hour charge time chargers (voltages of 7.2V, 8.4V, 9.6V, 10.8V, 12V, 13.2V, 14.4V, 15.6V, 16.8V, 18V, 19.2V, 20.4V, 21.6V, 22.8V and 24V).  A short list of some of the Brands that I carry are Skil, Black and Decker (B&D), Craftsman, Ryobi and Coleman.  I ONLY carry NEW Skil batteries at this time, but I may start to carry other batteries in the future.  I do usually have a few good tested USED batteries for all makes, however, as I get these in on trade-ins quite often.

Also, I can often repair FAST chargers (generally known as 1-hour or Smart Chargers).  Email me per the instructions in the paragraph below.

I even have REPAIR KITS for many of the SLOW chargers on the market!  And if I don't have a kit for your model on eBay NOW, I probably will shortly.  Just email me through one of my eBay auctions to get in contact with me.  That can be done by clicking on any of my auctions in the below link;

JRL Enterprises, LLC

...and then click on the "Ask a question" link in the upper right hand corner of any auction page. But don't purchase anything, unless you are in a hurry, as I can offer you much better pricing if you buy and pay OUTSIDE of eBay (through PayPal direct, or via Credit Card, Money Order or Cashiers Check.... or cash, if you happen to live near Milwaukee, WI).

 

                                           Happy shopping!

 


 

Click on any of the below pictures to browse my products on eBay! But if you want to save money, DON'T BUY ON EBAY!!!!! 
Email me instead (per the instructions above), and I can offer you a substantial discount!!

  

 

 


Ni-Cd BATTERY TEST INSTRUCTIONS if you *DO* have a Voltmeter

(see test below this one if you DO NOT)

 

  1. Take a DC voltage reading of your battery(s) before you attempt to charge it. Set the meter to the DC voltage setting, and to a range of above 29 volts DC.  Put one lead from your meter on the “+” (positive) terminal of the battery, and the other lead on the “-“ (negative) terminal.  Write down that voltage reading.  It may be of use to someone who you ask a question about your battery later!

 

  1. Now place a battery into a KNOWN GOOD SLOW CHARGER for 3 to 4 minutes… NO LONGER THAN THAT, or you risk burning out your SLOW charger!!   If you have a FAST, or SMART or 1-HOUR charger, then most of those types of chargers can charge a bad battery without risk of burning it out (Coleman Fast chargers excluded).  Now take another battery DC voltage reading per one of the below options; 

a)   If the reading is at, or ABOVE the voltage rating listed on the battery (in other words, 18 volts for an 18 volt battery), then your battery is fine and you can continue to charge it.  Your battery is able to be charged with a slow charger without much risk of burning it out.  Below I have listed some correct voltage ranges for a NEW or a GOOD USED battery with no dead cells, for several of the common voltages available on the market.  The voltage range for each cell inside a battery pack is from 1.35v to 1.45v.   Also listed is the number of cells inside each of these battery types; 

  9.6V  Batteries (   8 cells inside) – Should charge to 10.8v - 11.6v

12.0V  Batteries ( 10 cells inside) – Should charge to 13.5v - 14.5v

14.4V  Batteries ( 12 cells inside) – Should charge to 16.2v - 17.4v

18.0V  Batteries ( 15 cells inside) – Should charge to 20.3v - 21.8v

19.2V  Batteries ( 16 cells inside) – Should charge to 21.6v - 23.2v

24.0V  Batteries ( 20 cells inside) – Should charge to 27.0v - 29.0v

b)   If your battery is BELOW the rated voltage of the battery (in other words, 18 volts for an 18 volt battery), then let your charger cool off for 4-5 hours, and attempt this step again.  (If you do not allow the charger to cool off, you risk burning out your charger!!).  If you do this step several times, and the battery never reaches the battery voltage listed on the battery (18v for an 18 volt battery, in other words), the battery has some shorted/dead cells.  When one cell shorts, the others are usually soon to fail thereafter, AND the dead cells cause the charger to overheat.  I try to stay away from selling batteries, so I don’t say this to make a profit on selling you a battery!  I just tell you this to help you NOT burn out your slow charger!  I want you to be a satisfied customer, and recommend me to other people and come back to me for your future charger needs.

If your battery has some dead cells, you CAN continue to use it, as it won’t hurt your tool (drill, saw, etc.) that you are using it in… you just won’t get as much power out of it, and it won’t last quite as long as it would if all the cells are working properly.  BUT IT WILL BURN OUT YOUR SLOW CHARGER EVENTUALLY if you use it to charge a battery with dead/shorted cells!  Do not charge that battery with a slow charger…unless you don’t care about burning the charger out.


Ni-Cd BATTERY TEST INSTRUCTIONS if you do *NOT* have a Voltmeter

(see test above this one if you DO)

 

  1. Take your battery(s) to Batteries Plus, Radio Shack or any electronics or automotive repair shop and ask them to do a DC voltage test on your battery(s). They should set their meter to the DC voltage setting, and to a range over 29 volts DC.  Put one lead from the meter on the “+” (positive) terminal of the battery, and the other on the “-“ (negative) terminal.  Write down that voltage reading.  It may be of use to someone who you ask a question about your battery later!

 

  1. Now place a battery into a KNOWN GOOD SLOW CHARGER per one of the below options, “a” or “b” (it would be best to take the charger with you to the place testing the battery, but if they won’t let you use an outlet to plug the charger in to and charge your battery for a few minutes, then you’ll have to take the battery home with you);

 

a) Charge the battery for 2 to 3 minutes (NO LONGER THAN THAT, or you risk burning out your charger!!).  Then take another voltage reading from the battery;

If the reading is at, or ABOVE the voltage rating listed on the battery (in other words, 18 volts for an 18 volt battery), then your battery is fine and you can continue to charge it.  Your battery is able to be charged with a slow charger without much risk of burning it out.  Below I have listed some correct voltage ranges for a NEW or a GOOD USED battery with no dead cells, for several of the common voltages available on the market.  The voltage range for each cell inside a battery pack is from 1.35v to 1.45v.   Also listed is the number of cells inside each of these battery types;

 

  9.6V  Batteries (   8 cells inside) – Should charge to 10.8v - 11.6v

12.0V  Batteries ( 10 cells inside) – Should charge to 13.5v - 14.5v

14.4V  Batteries ( 12 cells inside) – Should charge to 16.2v - 17.4v

18.0V  Batteries ( 15 cells inside) – Should charge to 20.3v - 21.8v

19.2V  Batteries ( 16 cells inside) – Should charge to 21.6v - 23.2v

24.0V  Batteries ( 20 cells inside) – Should charge to 27.0v - 29.0v

If your battery is BELOW the rated voltage of the battery (in other words, 18 volts for an 18 volt battery), then let your charger cool off for 4-5 hours, and attempt this step again.  (If you do not allow the charger to cool off, you risk burning out your charger!!).  If you do this step several times, and the battery never reaches the battery voltage listed on the battery (18v for an 18 volt battery, in other words), the battery has some shorted/dead cells.  When one cell shorts, the others are usually soon to fail thereafter, AND the dead cells cause the charger to overheat.  I try to stay away from selling batteries, so I don’t say this to make a profit on selling you a battery!  I just tell you this to help you NOT burn out your slow charger!  I want you to be a satisfied customer, and recommend me to other people and come back to me for your future charger needs

 

b) Start charging the battery in question while at the same time monitoring the temperature of the battery and the charger.  If the battery or AC adapter (the part that plugs into the wall outlet) approaches a temperature that is very warm (almost too hot to touch), remove it from the charger or power source as soon as possible. This battery is causing the charger to overheat and will eventually burn out the charger if you continue the charging of THAT battery.

c) Usually this will happen with the first couple of minutes but do monitor it carefully for the entire first charging cycle of each battery. It is normal for a battery and charger to get slightly warm during the charging, but never to the point that either is too hot to handle comfortably. 

It is impossible to say exactly what temperature is WARM and what is HOT, so THAT is why THIS method of testing is only to be used as a last resort (you can’t get access to anyone who has a voltmeter).

 

If your battery has some dead cells, you CAN continue to use it, as it won’t hurt your tool (drill, saw, etc.) that you are using it in… you just won’t get as much power out of it, and it won’t last quite as long as it would if all the cells are working properly.  BUT IT WILL BURN OUT YOUR SLOW CHARGER EVENTUALLY if you use it to charge a battery with dead/shorted cells!  Do not charge it with a slow charger…unless you don’t care about burning it out.

 

===============================================================================================

 

Hints to make your Ni-Cad batteries last years and years;

 

  1. Never charge a NiCad battery until it is in need of a charge (when the drill/saw starts to turn slowly, or the flashlight goes dim).  But NEVER let the battery go COMPLETELY dead… that decreases the batteries life.  If you charge the battery, for example, after its power is only half used up, the NiCad battery will develop a “memory”, thinking it only needs to be charged half-way, and will only ACCEPT half a charge!  Once this happens, you must charge and almost fully discharge it SEVERAL TIMES to get rid of that “memory” affect which Ni-Cad batteries have.

 

  1. Store your NiCad battery when it is nearly fully DIS-charged, NOT when it has just been charged!  Your batteries will last much longer if you follow this simple rule.

 

  1. A NEW NiCad battery will last about 30 days if fully charged and not used (but don’t store them this way!!  See hint #2 above!)  So if your battery lasts less than that stored, it does not mean the battery is bad.  Rather, it is probably old or has been charged numerous times (you can usually get 400-500 charges out of a properly used NiCad battery).  But since the right way to use a NiCad is to fully charge it JUST BEFORE USE, and then store it fully DIS-charged, this fact should not really matter to you!

 

  1. Never charge a NiCad battery that is hot or has been outside in the cold for a long period of time.  Let it get to room temperature for a few hours before charging it.

 

  1. Store NiCad batteries between 50 and 75 degrees Fahrenheit. 

 

  1. Do not waste your money on one of the numerous battery “fix” or “resurrection” processes on eBay or the net.  THEY DO NOT WORK for more than a few hours or days.  Then you need to do the entire long process all over again to get the cells all working again.  It is only a very temporary solution, and does not work all the time either.

==========================================================================================================

 

eBay is having a problem with my auctions, making it impossible for anyone to contact me about the auctions if they have questions.  You should be able to click on any auction, then click on the “Ask a question” link.  Then a new page appears where there is supposed to be a “Contact Seller” button.  That button is missing on my auctions.

 

So due to this eBay problem, the only way you can contact me now is by sending me an email direct to WQ2121@sbcglobal.net, or by calling me at 414-353-7841 (you will probably have to start to leave a message on my machine, however, as I screen all calls for telemarketers!).  Sorry for any inconvenience.